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(6.25) Can respite providers be trained to address special medical needs of a person with a disability during respite service hours?

(6.25) Can respite providers be trained to address special medical needs of a person with a disability during respite service hours?

If they are trained by health care professionals, in-home respite workers can perform incidental medical services, including:

  • Colostomy and ileostomy services: changing bags and cleaning stoma site
  • Urinary catheter services: emptying and changing bags, and care of catheter site
  • Gastrostomy services: feeding, hydration, cleaning stoma, and adding routine medications ordered by a health care professional

These respite providers must also be trained in first aid and CPR and they must receive continuing education in these skills. Respite providers who perform incidental medical services can receive slightly more pay. Also, regional centers can reimburse respite service agencies for the additional training required for these providers.[1]Section 4686.

References
1 Section 4686.